Where History Lives

 

 

2:00 - 3:00 pm

by George W. Pedlow III, PhD

In White Oak Hall at Fort Roberdeau

FREE admission

 

Where's the lead? It's a question visitors frequently ask of Fort Roberdeau's tour guides. Geologist George Pedlow has the answer! By combining old maps with satellite maps, he can pinpoint the location of lead deposits in Sinking Valley. Join us in White Oak Hall for this fascinating and timely topic on the last Sunday of the 2016 40th Anniversary season.

 

As a child living in the country outside Lock Haven, George Pedlow introduced himself to geology when he found quartz crystals in a cliff next to the Lock Haven State Teachers College football field.  Thereafter, his father became interested, and they were 'rock hounds' together for years.  After graduating from Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA, with a major in geology, Pedlow worked for an engineering company on several acid mine drainage projects in Pennsylvania and Maryland, in both the bituminous and anthracite coal fields.  Pedlow earned a graduate degree and PhD at the University of South Carolina. From there he worked for a coal company in Pittsburgh and then on oil field research in California.  Returning to Pennsylvania, Pedlow was a consulting geologist for a number of years.  Several years after the fatal illness of his wife, Jeannie, Pedlow married Linda Morrow, who, with her late husband, Sinking Valley native David Morrow, had bought and restored Arch Spring Farm in Sinking Valley.  Now Sinking Valley offers endless opportunities for Pedlow to resume his childhood hobby of 'earth science' - even a little 'rock hounding'.

 

 

 

 

 Where's the Lead? Sunday, October 30

November 5, 2016 A Program for Our Vets

40th Anniversary Commemorative Items

  • Mugs $10 - Red White and Blue with Scenic Fort Picture.
  • Fort Roberdeau Coasters $16 with Free Storage Rack. You choose the scenes you want.
  • Individual Coasters $5

 

Grandview Hollow Pottery.

Come See Our Finely Crafted Pottery.

 

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Cannon Reconstruction